Well…

Sometimes, especially when you have almost no time for hobby, you need do put aside more complex projects just to make something different that you can finish in a short time. Its a kind of mental hygiene I guess. Below you can see my last such “fast and simple” project. A simple crank well. A universal design suitable for many fantasy, or historical settings spanning 2500 years. Below you can see the first test build and a test print.

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It is intended as a sort of demo set for my 3d models. Now ahead of me is the boring part – the instructions…

P.S. To all whom it may concern… Marry Christmas and all… šŸ˜› šŸ˜€

P.P.S Sol Invictus!

Codex Manesse – Pavilion

Today another (after the church) simple 3d model for Codex Manesse range. This time it is a knightly pavilion loosely inspired by Winli’s tent.

It is one of most commonly depicted (though not necessarily most common) kind of tent of high-to-late middle ages – round pavilion supported by a center pole. (As this model was to be as simple as can be, the center pole is not included :D. You can easily make one of paper roll or bamboo skewer). How the perimeter of the tent was erected is not entirely clear. Several concepts are used by re-enactment groups and experimental archaeologists with spoked wheel concept beingĀ  most common.

As you can see the tent is actually almost as big as CM church. I tried to keep it’s relative size to characters, according to original miniature and Codex Manesse art canon, and that demands inconsistent scaling of “architecture” elements :).

Manesse-tent

Anyway the model is fairly simple to make. Simply cut out elements, fold togue tabs and insert them into slots marked with corresponding letters,Ā  then put the tent top on the walls, and that’s it. The tents should stand on its own with no glue required (depending on paper density), allowing easy assembly and disassembly for storage. You can always glue it together if you like. Click on the image below to download PDF file allowing you to make a closed or opened tent with 3 different scallop patterns (Use layers tab to turnĀ desired options on or off ). To add size variety to your tent field you can cut out some segments of the tent to make narrower but taller tents. (The tent to the right on the photo above had 4 scallops and corresponding wall sections cut out).

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Scottish style blackhouse – using Meadow fences and Walls.

I was watching Rob Boy lately, (aĀ  filmĀ  I recommend to everyone, even if only roughly based on real Rob Roy’s life) and that inspired me to make this:

RR_1Meet Robert Roy MacGregor and his wife Mary MacGregor (and his cow – Cow MacGregor :P) in front of their house in the Scottish highlands. The characters are of course just a 5min sketches to set the mood, as the subject of this post is the house itself.
I love the look of the Scottish blackhouses. It’s like they were grown or pushed from under ground rather than build, and they blend into landscape as if they were always meant to be there.

Such houses built with dry stone walls with earthen core,Ā  roof covered with thatch or (as on this model) with turf, are actually one of the branches on an ancient tradition (reaching back to neolithic) of Central and North European longhouses where people and livestock were sheltered under one roof. Most these neolithic longhouses (where resources allowed) were build either of logs orĀ  wattle and daub, but where wood was scarce (as in Scottish highlands or Islands) stone or turf was used. Germanic or Viking longhouses stem Read more…

Gabion gun emplacement – using Meadow Fences and Walls

Here comes another gun emplacement made using elements of Meadow Fences and Walls set (and a linen thread).

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This time it is more modern gabion emplacement. As the firepower and widespread of firearms and artilerry increased in renaissance period, medieval wooden shields and hurdles proved not to be enough to protect the artillery crews and were replaced with gabion fortifications. Esentially a predecessor of modern sandbags or steel gabion fortifications these early Read more…

Medieval cannon emplacement – using Meadow Fences and Walls.

As promised, here comes the first idea of what can you do with Meadow Fences and Walls. – a medieval cannon siege emplacement.

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Shield lowered, as the crew is reloading the cannon

To be effective early cannons had to be placed and operated relatively close to the walls, often within range of bows or crossbows or other engines of defenders. To protect the crew against missiles and to hide operations from the sight of the enemy wooden hurdles and shields were erected at gun sites. Read more…

Walls and fences in the field.

I hereby announce that Meadow Fences and Walls set is up for grabs at Wargame Vault. As I have a lot (a LOT actually) of test prints made during designing this set scattered around, you can expect some tutorial or inspirational posts with examples of what you can make of this set beyond of what the name implies.