Well…

Sometimes, especially when you have almost no time for hobby, you need do put aside more complex projects just to make something different that you can finish in a short time. Its a kind of mental hygiene I guess. Below you can see my last such “fast and simple” project. A simple crank well. A universal design suitable for many fantasy, or historical settings spanning 2500 years. Below you can see the first test build and a test print.

20141225_Studnia_1

It is intended as a sort of demo set for my 3d models. Now ahead of me is the boring part – the instructions…

P.S. To all whom it may concern… Marry Christmas and all… 😛 😀

P.P.S Sol Invictus!

Codex Manesse – Pavilion

Today another (after the church) simple 3d model for Codex Manesse range. This time it is a knightly pavilion loosely inspired by Winli’s tent.

It is one of most commonly depicted (though not necessarily most common) kind of tent of high-to-late middle ages – round pavilion supported by a center pole. (As this model was to be as simple as can be, the center pole is not included :D. You can easily make one of paper roll or bamboo skewer). How the perimeter of the tent was erected is not entirely clear. Several concepts are used by re-enactment groups and experimental archaeologists with spoked wheel concept being  most common.

As you can see the tent is actually almost as big as CM church. I tried to keep it’s relative size to characters, according to original miniature and Codex Manesse art canon, and that demands inconsistent scaling of “architecture” elements :).

Manesse-tent

Anyway the model is fairly simple to make. Simply cut out elements, fold togue tabs and insert them into slots marked with corresponding letters,  then put the tent top on the walls, and that’s it. The tents should stand on its own with no glue required (depending on paper density), allowing easy assembly and disassembly for storage. You can always glue it together if you like. Click on the image below to download PDF file allowing you to make a closed or opened tent with 3 different scallop patterns (Use layers tab to turn desired options on or off ). To add size variety to your tent field you can cut out some segments of the tent to make narrower but taller tents. (The tent to the right on the photo above had 4 scallops and corresponding wall sections cut out).

namiot

Scottish style blackhouse – using Meadow fences and Walls.

I was watching Rob Boy lately, (a  film  I recommend to everyone, even if only roughly based on real Rob Roy’s life) and that inspired me to make this:

RR_1Meet Robert Roy MacGregor and his wife Mary MacGregor (and his cow – Cow MacGregor :P) in front of their house in the Scottish highlands. The characters are of course just a 5min sketches to set the mood, as the subject of this post is the house itself.
I love the look of the Scottish blackhouses. It’s like they were grown or pushed from under ground rather than build, and they blend into landscape as if they were always meant to be there.

Such houses built with dry stone walls with earthen core,  roof covered with thatch or (as on this model) with turf, are actually one of the branches on an ancient tradition (reaching back to neolithic) of Central and North European longhouses where people and livestock were sheltered under one roof. Most these neolithic longhouses (where resources allowed) were build either of logs or  wattle and daub, but where wood was scarce (as in Scottish highlands or Islands) stone or turf was used. Germanic or Viking longhouses stem Read more…

For whom the bell tolls – Codex Manesse – The Church.

Finally I managed to steal some time for the hobby and here is the effect. The church is my first attempt at creating Codex Manesse architecture, or any CM 3D piece at all. I was not sure if the feel of a medieval manuscript could be maintained in a 3d model, especially that in original manuscripts architecture is always secondary to characters (or scene in general) and either greatly undersized or just symbolic. Especially choosing the right size comparing to Codex Manesse minis was quite tricky. Too small ant the model is getting useless as a potential gaming piece, to big and it’s loosing the manuscript feel dominating the miniatures to much.  The end result of this little experiment you can see below

      Codex-manesse_Church_2     Codex-manesse_Church_1

The model consists of 3 separate pieces that can be variously arranged: a Belltower, a Nave and a Choir with a polygonal apse. The layout above would be most common but the belltower in example could be aligned to the side of the Nave, two  bell towers could flank the Nave, or it could be detached as a free standing campanila. The Nave itself works also on its own making a nice townhouse or a small Pfalz. As medieval architecture was generally additive in it’s nature, you can print multiple pieces and arrange them in many possible ways. Read more...

Read more…